Cruise

 

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Cruise (verb)
sail about in an area without a precise destination, especially for pleasure

I said I would only ever do an Alaskan cruise, since you’re standard, to the Caribbean type deal never appealed to me. Knowing myself well, I was really spot on. While Alaska & Canada were lovely, I most loved the days at sea. They really felt like vacation, and so calm. BUT, I am hooked, but where they go makes a huge different to me. Because my main MS symptom is heat intolerance, being able to be outside in August, not only at the ports, but also on the ship at the pool, was amazing. While I love the ocean, the beach in the summer is too hot for me, as are most beach destinations, even during the winter months. So this is a great option for me. And now I’m looking at another cruise next year through Scandanavian locales.

And while I’m not plugging the cruise line, and I don’t have any mobility challenges, I was so impressed by their efficiency. Just all around, the airline industry could really learn A LOT from them.

Beyond just being on top of getting people through security, check-in, and on board, I watched as people with differently abled needs had a separate area to support them. And once on board, I would say most all of the common areas were accessible, and even the jacuzzi and pool had a lift chair. Though I suspect, like any activity, it depends on how much (or not) assistance you might need. I can’t speak to the ease of ports, but from what I could see getting on / off the ship could work for most anyone. It now makes sense to me why some of the MS orgs do cruises as a group event.

Verdict? Sleep away camp for grown-ups, but better.

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Sick

Sick

Sick (adjective)
affected by physical or mental illness

Tis the season. In the beginning, back in 2009, after my diagnosis and starting treatment, I got sick. Like normal, regular, sick. It caught me off guard because, well duh, now that I had multiple sclerosis, clearly I was immune to the likes of viruses?! Yeah, no.

Each sniffle, cough, headache, turned into a phone call to my neurologist. He assured me that yes, I can still get run of the mill sick and that it was really just a matter of re-learning my body, and that no I definitely was not going to die from having a cold.

What it did do was make me more in tune with the rhythm of my body as I hadn’t been prior. I paid more attention to the sniffles, headaches, and coughs, whereas in the past I would have just moved on or not even notice. Now I had two autoimmune diseases to manage, while being completely insulted that I could still get run-of-the-mill ill.

Fast-forward eight plus years since my diagnosis, I’ve noticed that I actually get “normal sick” less than before. Said neurologist told me that “they” think there is some protective factor from the medicine I take for the multiple sclerosis, though it’s anecdotal.

Lately I’ve been traveling like a road warrior, which I didn’t think would ever happen again. I didn’t think my body could hold up to this type of work, travel, intensity. And while it’s not perfect, and I’m definitely older than I was when I used to do it, I’m more than holding my own with my business and travel. Sure I have gastroenteritis with a cold as a cherry on top, and I have to watch that the asthma is managed, and desperately hope my currently overactive, fighting these bugs, immune system doesn’t cause an MS flare-up, I can still trust in myself and my body.

Lest you think otherwise, I am so proper sick. From my head to my toes, body ache, tissue mounds on the floor, ordering extra Scott from Amazon…sick. Now excuse me while I go back to the “library” to answer the song of the gastroenteritis minstrels.

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