Onset

onset

Onset (noun)
the beginning of something, especially something unpleasant

It was the summer of 2008. I had just turned 39 and was in the south of France on vacation (living in Switzerland) with a friend. I’d been working dozens of hours a week and desperately needed a holiday. Unfortunately southern Europe was experiencing the worst heat wave they’d had in over a decade. It was 100 degrees which made it hard to do anything outdoors. We hid in shops, movie theatres, and cafes.

We were staying at a lovely winery and while we did taste some of the local fare, by no means were we walking around squiffy. One night I went to bed fine, and the next day I woke up with a numb butt. I remember asking my friend if that had ever happened to her, it had not.

That started my odyssey for a diagnosis. Flash back to a few years earlier and I did crisis work for a multiple sclerosis medicine that was removed from the market and re-released after proper precautions were put into place. In the deep recesses of my mind, I knew something was wrong aside from the everyday aches and pains we experience.

The next months would come with experiencing weakness in both legs, more numbness, and a lot of fatigue. Fatigue so bad that after sitting in a movie for two hours, I would walk a dozen steps and need to sit down on a bench.

I saw my GP, chiropractor, and acupuncturist. I knew that the weakness in both legs at the same time wasn’t sciatica since I have experience with that. Your sciatic nerve is on both sides and not connected. So it’s rare that would you have it bilaterally.

My GP did all kinds of blood work to rule out potential diagnosis, which is still currently the way you also rule IN the diagnosis of MS, including lumbar puncture. Tests for Lupus, lyme disease, syphilis (latent disease can cause neurological symptoms), and a brain tumor (more on this later).

The GP finally referred me to a general neurologist who did some basic motor skills tests and said that I was fine. In the U.S. I would have pushed for more test, and they likely would have at least done a brain MRI, though it may not have shown anything at that point.

In December I had an eye issue where my eyes had trouble focusing distance. No problem seeing up close, just distance. I saw an optometrist (no issue with my prescription) and referred to the eye clinic at the University Hospital. I spent NINE hours at the eye clinic one Saturday. It was like something out of the 1600s, literally. A few days later I met with the attending physician who said I likely had strabismus. Ok, so while my dad had it as a child, I’d just had an eye exam for my contact lenses a few months prior. So NO, it wasn’t strabismus, but rather like when you get a weird rash and the doctor calls it “contact dermatitis” because they have no idea what it really is.

I went back to the general neurologist who now thought it would be good to get a brain scan. Upon receipt of those images, his next idea was to do a lumbar puncture. Playing a doctor during the day, I knew there had to be something in between a brain scan and a sticking a HUGE needle into my back.

Between the results of the brain scan and the eye issue, this was sufficiently enough to freak me out. I was going home in a few days to have knee surgery (a story for another time). So I put my dad on the mission to get me into see a neurologist back home that could help me sort the issues. Two phone calls and 20 minutes later I had an appointment with one of the top neurologists in the U.S. who I still see to this day. I call it mobilizing the Jewish healthcare mafia. We ALWAYS have a doctor to recommend.

Two days later (NYC) I was in the neurologist’s office, images in hand, and parents for support. He reviewed the images and said he saw a few more tiny brain lesions, but nothing that would give him cause for concern. He did some motor skills tests and since I was asymptomatic at that point, he didn’t consider it MS. Phew! Dodged a virtual bullet. He gave me his card and said call his mobile any time and we were on his way.

Three months went by and all was fine. Then the last week of March I couldn’t get my feet warm at all. Warm water, double socks, heating pad. My feet were constantly cold. And over the course of the week I went numb from my feet up over my stomach. Not paralyzed, but numb. I could still walk and no one was on the wiser.

I finally called my GP and although he felt it would subside it was probably time to go to the ER. I took a shower, packed some clothes, and hopped on the tram to the hospital. In hindsight I probably should have waited to text my dad because it was 10a where I was and 4a here in NYC.

They took me back into a room and I immediately called the neurologist I’d seen in NY a few months earlier. It was really important for me to have someone back home in the healthcare system who a) knew where I was and b) could be connected into the treating physician. Turns out I was at the hospital where the top MS institute in Europe is located.

When subscribing to the blog, please check your email (in box and spam/junk) for the confirmation note. Once you confirm, you’re good to go and will receive posts. 

Organize

organize

Organize (verb)
to form as or into a whole consisting of interdependent or coordinated parts, especially for united action

If there’s one thing that most people know about me, it’s that I enjoy being organized and I really don’t like clutter. Please don’t even get me started about how I feel when I see someone’s phone has a zillion unchecked emails, texts, or messages! I’ve been sought after both professionally and personally for my organizational skills. Now I’m not quite Felix from The Odd Couple, but I suppose run a close second.

This started long before the MS; however, is probably more important now than ever. Being organized keeps me from (mostly) forgetting or losing things and helps with peace and calm in my home. “A place for everything and everything in its place.” [Ben Franklin]

One of the areas that it’s important to be organized is visits to your healthcare providers. People have often complained to me about one issue or another with their doctors and sometimes I respond and ask how they prepared for the visit. Crickets.

In order to get the most out of my healthcare provider (HCP) visits and form a partnership in my care, I created a template document that I fill out, and take with me, to each office visit.

For me the most important part is preparing in advance, including the reason for the visit and questions. This gives you a chance to organize your thoughts and maximize your visit.

The office visit sheet can be used as a reference and to take notes for review later.  This information can either be maintained electronically or in a binder, whichever works for you. When you live with a chronic or acute disease or disorder, it’s extremely important to be organized and have all of your files at your fingertips (test results, CDs of images, etc.).
Of note: you own your medical records! 

Format as follows and link to document [HCP office visit template]

Name complete date of birth
Office visit date

Issues for discussion
bullet points or numbers

Medicines
name, dose, administration, frequency, length of time taking
bullet points or numbers

Vitamins
name, dose, administration, frequency, length of time taking
bullet points or numbers

For more extensive record keeping you can also include family history of illnesses if known.

Keep this information on your phone for ease of access re: emergencies. Bring two copies to the visit, one for you and the other for your HCP.

When subscribing to the blog, please check your email (in box and spam/junk) for the confirmation note. Once you confirm, you’re good to go and will receive posts. 

DĂ©but

Beginning

Multiple Sclerosis (noun)
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system characterized by loss of some of the myelin sheath surrounding certain nerve fibers and resulting in speech and visual disorders, tremor, muscular incoordination, partial paralysis, etc.

The most intriguing part of the above description, for me, is the “etc.” Etc are the moments we live in during our day-to-day. The etc can include buzzing (paresthesia) that resembles a jack hammer, fatigue so crushing you wake up only needing to go back to sleep, numbness from your head to your toes, loss of vision (optic neuritis), issues with bladder and bowel, etc. On the bad days, the etc can leave you wanting to tweeze the hair on your head one strand at a time. The honest people admit it just sucks sometimes.

Currently there are four classified types of MS:
clinically isolated syndrome
relapsing remitting
primary progressive
secondary progressive

I live with relapsing, remitting, which means I can have an exacerbation and then go back to having little to no symptoms. There are also pseudo-exacerbations like how anything above 70 degrees sends me running for cover, but as soon as I cool down I’m ok.

People who live with these types of diseases and disorders can never forget. I don’t wake up in the morning, go through my day and get back into bed and think, “oh right I have MS.” That doesn’t happen. Even on the good days, you always remember you have MS.

For the first year I was quite ill and mistakenly thought that once I felt better I could project manage the disease and move on with life. I grossly underestimated the impact this disease would have on me both physically and emotionally. The irony? When we would sit around as teens talking about how we would want to die when we were old, my biggest fear was getting stuck in a body that didn’t work with a brain that did. Joke’s on me! But at least I do have a brain (confirmed by many, MANY MRIs).

While no one knows what the future holds, a disease like MS puts a bit more uncertainty in our already uncertain future. Did you know that humans are the only species who know they are going to die one day?

Today is the 8th anniversary of my diagnosis. While some milestones can easily go by without a thought, given it’s tax day, it’s doubly hard to forget.

I hope you will join me on this journey as I share stories, health information (of all kinds, not just MS), real facts, my life in faux pas, and just random ramblings.